Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/a-1819-1669
Original Article

Effect of Maternal Subclinical Hypothyroidism on Congenital Hypothyroidism Screening Results: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Sabriye Korkut
1   Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Ankara City Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Ankara, Turkey
,
Nilgün Çaylan
2   Department of Child and Adolescents Health, Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Public Health, Ankara, Turkey
,
3   Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ankara City Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Ankara, Turkey
,
Mustafa Ş. Akın
1   Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Ankara City Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Ankara, Turkey
,
Meryem Ceyhan
3   Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ankara City Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Ankara, Turkey
,
Fatih Kara
4   Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Public Health, Ankara, Turkey
,
Başak Tezel
2   Department of Child and Adolescents Health, Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Public Health, Ankara, Turkey
,
Şerife S. Oğuz
1   Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Ankara City Hospital, University of Health Sciences, Ankara, Turkey
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the results of congenital hypothyroidism screening (CHS) in neonates born to women with subclinical hypothyroidism (SHT) during pregnancy and to identify maternal and neonatal characteristics associated with recall rate in CHS.

Study Design This retrospective cohort study included nonrefugee pregnant women and newborn pairs who underwent thyroid function tests during prenatal follow-up between 2014 and 2017 and had neonatal CHS records. The women were evaluated overall and divided into euthyroidism (ET) and SHT groups according to their thyroid function tests. The groups were compared in terms of CHS results. Neonates with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels <5.5 mIU/L were considered “normal,” while those with values ≥5.5 mIU/L were “recall.”

Results The antenatal thyroid function data of a total of 22,383 pregnant women were analyzed. Of these, 71.6% were ET and 16.3% were diagnosed as SHT. Overall, the recall rate accounted for 5.34% of all CHS results and the recall rate was higher in the SHT group (7.10%) compared with the ET group (5.54%; p = 0.001). Being low birth weight (LBW) or large for gestation age (LGA), maternal TSH above the 97.5th percentile, and cesarean delivery increased the risk of recall in CHS (p ˂ 0.05).

Conclusion The recall rate was higher among the neonates of mothers with SHT. Being LBW or LGA, maternal TSH above the 97.5th percentile and cesarean delivery increased the risk of recall in CHS.

Key Points

  • SHT is the most common form of hypothyroidism in pregnancy.

  • TSH elevation is higher among the neonates of mothers with SHT.

  • Being LBW or LGA, and cesarean delivery also increase the risk of TSH elevation in infants.

Note

This study has been selected as an oral presentation in Online National Neonatology Congress (UNEKO-28) on December 10–14, 2020.




Publication History

Received: 14 February 2022

Accepted: 31 March 2022

Accepted Manuscript online:
06 April 2022

Article published online:
06 June 2022

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