Int J Sports Med 2014; 35(12): 1030-1036
DOI: 10.1055/s-0034-1368784
Training & Testing
© Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Which Are The Best VO2 Sampling Intervals to Characterize Low to Severe Swimming Intensities?

K. de Jesus
1   Centre of Research, Education, ­Innovation and Intervention in Sport, Faculty of Sport, ­University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
,
L. Guidetti
2   University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy
,
K. de Jesus
1   Centre of Research, Education, ­Innovation and Intervention in Sport, Faculty of Sport, ­University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
,
J. P. Vilas-Boas
1   Centre of Research, Education, ­Innovation and Intervention in Sport, Faculty of Sport, ­University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
3   Porto Biomechanics ­Laboratory (LABIOMEP), Porto, Portugal
,
C. Baldari
2   University of Rome “Foro Italico”, Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, Division of Health Sciences, Rome, Italy
,
R. J. Fernandes
1   Centre of Research, Education, ­Innovation and Intervention in Sport, Faculty of Sport, ­University of Porto, Porto, Portugal
3   Porto Biomechanics ­Laboratory (LABIOMEP), Porto, Portugal
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History



accepted after revision 15 January 2014

Publication Date:
03 June 2014 (online)

Abstract

Cardiorespiratory response in swimming has been used to better understand aerobic performance, especially by assessing oxygen uptake (VO2). The current study aimed to compare different VO2 time-averaging intervals throughout low to severe swimming intensities, hypothesizing that VO2 values are similar for different time averages at low to moderate and heavy swimming intensities, but not for the severe domain. 20 male trained swimmers completed an incremental protocol of 7×200 m until exhaustion (0.05 m/s increments and 30 s intervals). VO2 was measured by a portable gas analyser connected to a snorkel system. 6 time average intervals (breath-by-breath, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 s) were compared for all the protocol steps. Breath-by-breath and 5 s average exhibited higher VO2 values than averages≥10 s for all swimming intensities (P≤0.02; partial η2≤0.28). VO2 values did not differ between 10, 15, 20 and 30 s averages throughout the incremental protocol (P>0.05; partial η2≤0.05). Furthermore, 10 and 15 s averages showed the lowest VO2 mean difference (0.19 mL · kg−1 · min−1). For the 6 time average intervals analysed, 10 and 15 s averages were those that showed the lowest changes on VO2 values. We recommended the use of 10 and 15 s time averaging intervals to determine relevant respiratory gas exchange parameters along a large spectrum of swimming intensities.