Amer J Perinatol 2018; 35(03): 209-214
DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1604196
SMFM Fellowship Series Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Insulin Delivery Method and Admission for Glycemic Control in Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Jeffrey D. Sperling
Division of Maternal–Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, California
,
Lindsay Maggio
Maternal Fetal Care Center, Florida Hospital Medical Group, Orlando, Florida
,
Phinnara Has
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
,
Julie Daley
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
,
Donald R. Coustan
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
,
Erika F. Werner
Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

24 February 2017

08 June 2017

Publication Date:
14 July 2017 (eFirst)

Abstract

Objective To determine if there was a difference in glycemic control admissions or perinatal outcomes in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) treated with multiple daily injections (MDIs) versus continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII).

Materials and Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of women with type 1 DM with a singleton gestation who delivered between 2006 and 2014 at a tertiary hospital and received care at a dedicated DM clinic. Women who used MDI were compared with those who used CSII. The primary outcome was glycemic control admission during pregnancy. Secondary outcomes included adverse perinatal outcomes.

Results There were a total of 156 women; 107 treated with MDI and 49 with CSII. Women treated with MDI had higher rates of glycemic control admissions versus those treated with CSII (68.2 vs. 30.6%, p < 0.001). Adjusting for age, ethnicity, public insurer, duration of DM, first recorded hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and DM comorbidities, the likelihood of admission remained higher in women on MDI versus CSII (AOR 5.9 [1.7–20.6]). Women treated with MDI had higher rates of postprandial hypoglycemia. Other perinatal outcomes were similar between the groups.

Conclusion Women with type 1 DM treated with MDI were more likely to have glycemic control admissions and postprandial hypoglycemia than those treated with CSII.