Jnl Wrist Surg 2019; 08(03): 198-201
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1677740
Scientific Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Posterior Interosseous Neurectomy Alternative for Treating Chronic Wrist Pain

Ashraf M. Abdelaziz
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Alzhraa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine for Girls, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Wael Aldahshan
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Alzhraa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine for Girls, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Faisal Ahmed Hashem El-Sherief
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Alzhraa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine for Girls, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Yaser El Sayed Hassan Wahd
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Alzhraa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine for Girls, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Hany Abdel Gawwad Soliman
1  Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Alzhraa University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine for Girls, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

07 April 2018

21 December 2018

Publication Date:
29 January 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Background Wrist denervation is one of the several available options for treating chronic wrist pain; partial wrist denervation performed through a single dorsal incision by resecting the distal posterior interosseous nerve provides good outcomes.

Questions/Purposes This study evaluated the results of posterior interosseous neurectomy (PIN) in patients with chronic wrist pain secondary to scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC).

Methods In total, 30 wrists obtained from 28 patients (25 males, 3 females) were assessed. The dominant hands of 25 (right-handed) patients, nondominant hands of 5, and both hands of 2 were considered. The average age at the time of surgery was 35 (range: 19–50) years, and the average follow-up duration was 18 (range: 12–30) months. Fifteen and 13 patients had wrists with SNAC and SLAC, respectively, and all of those underwent PIN performed through the dorsal approach. The pre- and postoperative range of motion, grip strength, and pain relief percentage were recorded for all the 30 wrists.

Results The average postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 30 (range: 20–80), and the difference between the pre- and postoperative scores was statistically significant. Ninety percent of the patients were satisfied with the results of PIN and reported improvement in grip strength and pain relief.

Conclusions Thus, PIN may be an effective surgical technique for wrist reconstruction.

Clinical Relevance To help patients challenge pain and maintain their wrist joint range of motion.