Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(03): 277-280
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1678534
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Less Invasive Surfactant Administration in Spain: A Survey Regarding Its Practice, the Target Population, and Premedication Use

1  Department of Neonatology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain
,
1  Department of Neonatology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain
,
Fatima Camba
1  Department of Neonatology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain
,
Juan Jose Comuñas
1  Department of Neonatology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain
,
Felix Castillo
1  Department of Neonatology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

22 June 2018

03 January 2019

Publication Date:
04 February 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective Scientific evidence supports the use of less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) techniques, but certain issues may be limiting its generalized incorporation in clinical practice. The objectives were to determine the level of acceptance of LISA techniques in Spanish hospitals, the types of methods used, the target population, and the premedication administered.

Study Design An online survey was designed and sent to various secondary/tertiary hospitals in Spain.

Results Among 67 neonatal units contacted, 44 (65.7%) participated. LISA was used in 89%, and those that did not perform the technique were contemplating its use in the future. In total, 77% of hospitals used some type of pharmacologic sedation/analgesia before the procedure: 28% always and 49% sometimes. In all cases, the reason for premedication was concerned about pain and discomfort. The types of drugs and doses varied.

Conclusion LISA has been incorporated in clinical practice of the hospitals surveyed, with a utilization rate higher than what has been reported to date. Sedation and analgesia are commonly administered. LISA is viewed as potentially involving some degree of pain and discomfort. Further studies are needed to determine the safest and most effective pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic measures to apply in these procedures.