Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(03): 313-321
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1678559
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Passive Range-of-Motion Exercise and Bone Mineralization in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Rania A. El-Farrash
1  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Ibrahim S. Abo-Seif
1  Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Abeer K. El-Zohiery
2  Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Gehan M. Hamed
3  Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
,
Reham M. Abulfadl
4  Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Maternity Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.
Further Information

Publication History

17 September 2018

06 January 2019

Publication Date:
07 February 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective To assess the effect of range-of-motion exercise program on bone mineralization and somatic growth of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants.

Study Design A total of 36 VLBW infants were randomized into 18 VLBW infants receiving range-of-motion exercise and 18 VLBW control infants receiving tactile stimulation for 4 weeks. Laboratory investigations were performed at baseline and postexercise and included serum calcium, serum phosphorus (s.PO4), magnesium, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), urinary calcium/phosphate ratio, and serum carboxy-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed at the end of the exercise protocol to measure bone mineral content, bone mineral density (BMD), bone area, lean mass, and fat mass.

Results The weight and the rate of weight gain were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the exercise group compared with controls postexercise. Also, higher s.PO4, lower ALP, and lower urinary calcium/phosphate ratio were observed postexercise in the exercise group (p = 0.001, p = 0.005, and p = 0.04, respectively), whereas serum CTX showed no difference between the two groups (p = 0.254). Postexercise BMD significantly improved in the exercise group (p < 0.001) compared with controls.

Conclusion Although the sample size was small, we may be able to suggest favorable effects of range-of-motion exercise versus tactile stimulation on bone metabolism, BMD, and short-term growth in VLBW infants.

Authors' Contributions

All authors were involved in the concept, design, data collection, analysis, and drafting of the manuscript.


Supplementary Material