Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(02): 146-150
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1683958
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Cytomegalovirus Infection among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units, California, 2005 to 2016

Chinh Tran
1  School of Medicine, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California
2  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
,
Mihoko V. Bennett
2  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
3  School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
Jeffrey B. Gould
2  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
3  School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
Henry C. Lee
2  California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford, California
3  School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California
,
4  Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

20 December 2018

13 February 2019

Publication Date:
20 March 2019 (online)

Abstract

Aim The main purpose of this article is to assess trends in cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection reported among infants in California neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) during 2005 to 2016.

Study Design The California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative collects data on all very low birth weight (VLBW, birth weight ≤ 1,500 g) and acutely ill infants > 1,500 g, representing 92% of NICUs in California. We compared clinical characteristics and length of hospital stay among infants with and without reported CMV infection (CMV-positive viral culture or polymerase chain reaction).

Results During 2005 to 2016, CMV infection was reported in 174 VLBW infants and 145 infants > 1,500 g, or 2.7 (range: 1.5–4.7) and 1.2 (range: 0.8–1.7) per 1,000 infants, respectively (no significant annual trend). Among infants > 1,500 g, 12 (8%) versus 4,928 (4%) of those reported with versus without CMV infection died (p < 0.05). The median hospital stay was significantly longer among infants reported with versus without CMV infection for both VLBW infants (98 vs. 46 days) and infants > 1,500 g (61 vs. 14 days) (p < 0.001).

Conclusion Reports of CMV infection remained stable over a 12-year period. Although we were not able to assess whether infection was congenital or postnatal, CMV infection among infants > 1,500 g was associated with increased mortality.

Note

The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.