Journal of Pediatric Epilepsy 2019; 08(01): 002-010
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692146
Review Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Electroencephalography and Epilepsy Course at UH Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States

1  Division of Pediatric Epilepsy, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Michael Devereaux
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Hesham Abboud
3  Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Fareeha Ashraf
4  Department of Neurology, Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Mark Cohen
5  Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Marta Couce
5  Department of Pathology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Suzanne DeBrosse
6  Center for Human Genetics, Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Philip Fastenau
3  Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Guadalupe Fernandez-Baca Vaca
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Naiara Garcia-Losarcos
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Mustafa Kahriman
4  Department of Neurology, Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Nuria Lacuey
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Marge Marsey
7  Clinical Nutrition Services, Digestive Health Institute, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Jonathan Miller
8  Division of Functional Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Neurological Institute, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Carol Rosen
9  Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Asim Shahid
1  Division of Pediatric Epilepsy, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Rachel Tangen
10  Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics and Psychology, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospitals Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Michael Wien
11  Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
,
Hans Lüders
2  Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
12  Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 February 2019

02 April 2019

Publication Date:
07 June 2019 (online)

Abstract

Prof. Hans Lüders organized the first International Electroencephalography (EEG)/Epilepsy course in Cleveland (Ohio, United States) in 1979. His vision was to impart a framework of basic knowledge in EEG and epilepsy. The course participants are assumed to have no prior knowledge of EEG or epilepsy. As such, the course is structured and paced to meet the expectations set forth by the organizing committee at the completion of the course. The curriculum has evolved over the years to reflect advancement of the field. There is an added emphasis on semiology (seizure semiology) and epileptic disorders. Also, the course content has expanded to include broader topics such as the intersection between epilepsy and sleep medicine for both adults and children. The course lasts 8 weeks and is offered twice a year, free of charge, in winter and summer at the University Hospital in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. The average class size ranges from 25 to 30, composed of individuals from around the world. The class hours are generally from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Daily attendance is expected as new concepts quickly build on previous ones. Midterm and final examinations are used for evaluations. Both written and verbal feedbacks on homework assignments are given daily. At the end of the course, a certificate of completion is awarded. The purpose of this article is to discuss the structural details of this intensive educational course that has been offered for 40 years.

Note

This study was presented at the American Epilepsy Society (AES) 71st Annual Meeting 2017, Washington, District of Columbia.