Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1692685
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Self-Reported Alcohol, Tobacco, and Marijuana Use in Pregnant Women with Depressive Symptomatology

Jennifer Hyer
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health and Hospital Authority, Denver, Colorado
,
Claire Ulrickson
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Denver Health and Hospital Authority, Denver, Colorado
,
Elise Yerelian
2  Department of Family Medicine, SCL Health, Denver, Colorado
,
Torri D. Metz
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
Amanda A. Allshouse
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah
,
M. Camille Hoffman
4  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado
5  Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado
› Author Affiliations
Funding The authors would also like to thank the Zoma Foundation and the Denver Health Foundation for their grant support in the completion of this project. The contents of this report represent the views of the authors and do not represent the views of the Zoma Foundation or the Denver Health Foundation.
Further Information

Publication History

22 February 2019

14 May 2019

Publication Date:
25 June 2019 (online)

Abstract

Background Substance use disorders often coexist with depression. The objective of this study was to establish whether pregnant women who report depressive symptomatology were more likely to report use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana during pregnancy.

Study Design This was a secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network Preterm Prediction Study. Self-reported history of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use was compared between pregnant women with and without depressive symptomatology with adjustment for demographic factors.

Results After adjustment for demographic factors, women with depressive symptomatology were more likely to report: any alcohol use (odds ratio [OR]: 1.4, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–1.8), > 1 drink per week (OR: 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0–1.8), and >1 drink per day (OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5–3.4). Women with depressive symptomatology were also more likely to report use of marijuana (OR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2–2.6) and cigarettes (OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1–1.7).

Conclusion Depressive symptomatology was associated with an increase in self-reported the use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana during pregnancy. These data reveal the importance of targeted screening of pregnant women with depressive symptomatology for substance use.