Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(02): 196-203
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1694983
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Two-Year Outcomes of Infants with Stage 2 or Higher Retinopathy of Prematurity: Results from a Large Multicenter Registry

Veeral N. Tolia
1  Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas
2  Pediatrix Medical Group, Dallas, Texas
3  The MEDNAX Center for Research, Education, Quality and Safety, Sunrise, Florida
,
Kaashif A. Ahmad
2  Pediatrix Medical Group, Dallas, Texas
3  The MEDNAX Center for Research, Education, Quality and Safety, Sunrise, Florida
4  Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas
,
Jack Jacob
5  Providence Alaska Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska
,
Amy S. Kelleher
3  The MEDNAX Center for Research, Education, Quality and Safety, Sunrise, Florida
,
Nick McLane
6  Greenville Health System, Greenville, South Carolina
,
Robert W. Arnold
5  Providence Alaska Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska
,
Reese H. Clark
3  The MEDNAX Center for Research, Education, Quality and Safety, Sunrise, Florida
6  Greenville Health System, Greenville, South Carolina
,
for the MEDNAX ROP Registry Investigators› Author Affiliations
Funding This study was funded by the Center for Research, Education, Quality, and Safety at MEDNAX, Inc.
Further Information

Publication History

17 April 2019

09 July 2019

Publication Date:
03 September 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective To define the incidence of ophthalmologic morbidities in the first 2 years of life among infants diagnosed with stage 2 or higher retinopathy of prematurity (ROP).

Study Design We prospectively enrolled premature infants with stage 2 or higher ROP. The infants were followed up for 2 years, and we report on data collected from outpatient ophthalmology and primary care visits.

Results We enrolled 323 infants who met inclusion criteria, of which 112 (35%) received treatment with laser surgery (90) or bevacizumab (22). Two-year follow-up was available for 292 (90%) of the cohort. The most common ophthalmologic conditions at follow-up were hyperopia (35%), astigmatism (30%), strabismus (21.9%), myopia (19.2%), anisometropia (12%), and amblyopia (12%). Severe ophthalmologic morbidities such as retinal detachment and cataracts were rare, but occurred in both treated and untreated infants. Overall, 22.6% of the infants were wearing glasses at 2 years, including 8.5% of the untreated infants.

Conclusion Patients with stage 2 or higher ROP remain at significant risk for ophthalmological morbidity through 2 years of age. Infants with regression of subthreshold ROP who do not require treatment represent an underrecognized population at long-term ophthalmological risk.

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01559571.

MEDNAX ROP Registry Investigators

William Archer, MD, Texas Health Resources–Presbyterian Hospital Dallas (Dallas, TX); Barbara Carr, MD, St. Luke's Hospital of Kansas City (Kansas City, MO); Bradlee Drabant, MD, Spring Valley Hospital; Summerlin Hospital Medical Center; Valley Hospital Medical Center (Las Vegas, NV); Jay Kothadia, MD, Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center (Charlotte, NC); Martha Manar, MD, Northside Hospital (Atlanta, GA); Joe Mendiola Jr., MD, McAllen Medical Center (McAllen, TX); Renuka K. Reddy, MD, Texas Health Resources–Presbyterian Hospital Plano (Plano, TX); David Riley, MD, MBA, Cook Children's Medical Center (Fort Worth, TX); Jayesh Shah, MD, Charleston Area Medical Center (Charleston, WV); Mustafa Suterwala, MD, Baylor University Medical Center (Dallas, TX); Vivek Vijayamadhavan, MD, Methodist Children's Hospital (San Antonio, TX); Kelly Von Herbulis, NNP, Memorial Health University Medical Center (Savannah, GA); David Wells, MD, Greenville Memorial Hospital (Greenville, SC); Robert D. White, MD, Memorial Hospital South Bend (South Bend, IN).


Contributors

Janna Benston, RN, MSN, Northside Hospital (Atlanta, GA); Katrina Grier, RNC-NIC, Northside Hospital (Atlanta, GA); Sheryl Hollander, RN, BSN, Novant Health Presbyterian Medical Center (Charlotte, NC); Mashelle Monhaut, MSN, NNP-BC, Memorial Hospital South Bend (South Bend, IN); Denise P. Smith, BSN, RNC-LRN, RRT-NPS, Winnie Palmer Hospital for Women & Babies (Orlando, FL); Vivian Vargas-Brown, Pediatrix Medical Group of Nevada (Las Vegas, NV). Administrative support was provided by: Carole Benson, Jaclyn Cohen, Nalina Fisher, Theresa Katich, Kathy McCarty, Octavia Reed, Vernice Vixamar, and Shannon Weeks.