Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(01): 079-085
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1700859
SMFM 2019
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Perinatal Outcomes of Women Aged 50 Years and Above

Erez Maoz-Halevy
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Gali Pariente
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Eyal Sheiner
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
,
Tamar Wainstock
2  Department of Epidemiology and Health Services Evaluation, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

06 September 2019

22 September 2019

Publication Date:
18 November 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective Pregnancies among women aged 40 and above are increasing in frequency. Nevertheless, little is known about the perinatal outcomes of women aged 50 years and above. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pregnancy outcomes in women at an extremely advanced maternal age of 50 years or above.

Study Design In a population-based cohort study, perinatal outcomes of women aged 50 years and above were compared with pregnancies in women according to maternal age. All singleton deliveries that occurred between the years 1991 and 2014 in a tertiary medical center were included. We excluded fetuses with congenital anomalies and chromosomal abnormality. Logistic regression models were used to control for confounders.

Results During the study period, 242,771 deliveries were included, of which 234,824 (96.7%) occurred in women aged < 40 years, 7,321 (3.0%) in women aged 40 to 44 years, 558 (0.2%) in women aged 45 to 49 years, and 68 (0.03%) in women aged 50 years and above. Maternal age of 50 years and above was noted as an independent risk factor for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), low Apgar scores, and cesarean delivery. Nevertheless, among pregnancies of women aged 50, pregnancy outcomes including GDM, preterm delivery, cesarean delivery, lower Apgar scores at 5 minutes (<7), and perinatal mortality were not significantly different than pregnancy outcomes of women aged 40 to 49 years.

Conclusion Pregnancy at the maternal age of 50 years and older is independently associated with higher rates of GDM, cesarean delivery, and lower Apgar scores at 5 minutes; however, most perinatal complications were not higher compared with pregnant women aged 40 to 49 years. These findings suggest that while there is an increased risk of perinatal complications in pregnancies of women aged 40 years or above compared with younger women, there are no significant increased risks in women aged over 50 years.

Condensation

Pregnancies in women aged 50 years and older show similar rates of selected perinatal complications compared with women aged above 40 years.


Note

This study was presented in part at the 39th annual meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Las Vegas, NV, February 11–16, 2019 (control ID number 1013–000547).