Am J Perinatol 2020; 37(01): 092-103
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-3400306
SMFM 2019
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Antibiotics for 3rd and 4th Degree Vaginal Lacerations, Uterine Tamponade, and Manual Placental Extraction

Conrad N. Stern-Ascher
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Yongmei Huang
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Cassandra R. Duffy
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Maria Andrikopoulou
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Jason D. Wright
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Dena Goffman
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Mary E. D'Alton
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Alexander M. Friedman
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

25 September 2019

03 October 2019

Publication Date:
22 November 2019 (online)

Abstract

Objective Trends in use of antibiotics during delivery hospitalizations complicated by (1) 3rd/4th degree vaginal lacerations, (2) manual placenta extraction, and (3) uterine tamponade are not well characterized. The objective of this study was to analyze trends in antibiotic use during vaginal delivery hospitalizations complicated by these three clinical scenarios.

Study Design An administrative inpatient database was used to perform a serial cross-sectional analysis of antibiotic administration during delivery hospitalizations in the United States from January 2006 to March 2015. The primary outcome was receipt of antibiotics during vaginal delivery hospitalizations complicated by (1) 3rd and 4th degree vaginal lacerations, (2) manual placenta extraction, and (3) uterine tamponade. Patients with other indications for antibiotics were excluded. The Cochran–Armitage test was used to assess trends. Adjusted log linear regression analyses including demographic, hospital, and obstetric factors were performed to analyze factors associated with antibiotic receipt for each of these three clinical scenarios in both primary and sensitivity analyses.

Results From 2006 to 2015 the rate of antibiotic administration during delivery hospitalizations decreased from 43.1% in 2006 to 25.5% for 3rd and 4th degree lacerations and from 59.6% to 49.2% for manual extraction (p < 0.01). Administration of antibiotics in the setting of uterine tamponade decreased from 48.6% in 2006 to 27.6% in 2009 before rising to 62.5% in the first quarter of 2015. In adjusted analyses, comparing the first quarter of 2015 to 2006 adjusted risk ratios for antibiotic administration were 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56–0.66) for 3rd and 4th degree vaginal lacerations, 0.76 (95% CI 0.53–1.09) for manual placental extraction, and 0.83 (95% CI 0.76–0.92) for uterine tamponade.

Conclusion Antibiotics are not used consistently during vaginal deliveries complicated by 3rd/4th degree lacerations, manual placenta extraction, and uterine tamponade. These findings support that a significant opportunity exists for comparative effectiveness research to assist in characterizing best practices.

Note

This study was presented at the 39th Annual Meeting for the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine, February, 2019, Las Vegas, Nevada.


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