J Reconstr Microsurg 2020; 36(07): 486-493
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1709453
Original Article
Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

Large and Uneven Bites in End-to-End Anastomosis of the Rat Femoral Artery

Yuan Dian Zheng
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
Celine F. Nicolas
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
John J. Corvi
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
Joey S. Kurtzman
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
Katherine H. Park
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
Shana M. Coley
2  Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Charles C. Marboe
2  Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University, New York, New York
,
Yelena Akelina
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
,
Robert J. Strauch
1  Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, New York, New York
› Author Affiliations
Funding This project was funded in part by a Surgical Specialties Corporation grant to the Microsurgery Training and Research Laboratory at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center.
Further Information

Publication History

23 September 2019

23 February 2020

Publication Date:
17 April 2020 (online)

Abstract

Background Successful microvascular anastomosis depends on sutures that adequately oppose both cut vessel edges. Trainees tend to take oversized or uneven bite. To improve early microsurgical skill acquisition using the rat, this study tests the belief that such bites compromise early patency by applying exaggerated bites to end-to-end arterial anastomoses.

Methods Twelve Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of the four bite techniques to be applied to both femoral arteries (mean diameter, 0.8 mm). Large (L) and standard (S) bites measured 1.0 and 0.2 mm from the edge, respectively. Eight simple interrupted anastomoses were performed per bite technique, each labeled according to every proximal end bite size, followed by every distal end bite size: LL, LS, SL, and SS. Anastomosis time and blood flow rates were recorded and analyzed statistically. After sacrifice 5 days postoperation, anastomosis sections of each technique were examined histologically.

Results All 24 anastomoses (100%) maintained patency for 5 days. There was no statistical difference between all postoperative blood flow measurements at any given time. Anastomosis times using LL, LS, SL, and SS bite techniques were 41.6, 33.2, 34.8, and 25.5 minutes, respectively. Anastomosis time for the traditional bite technique (SS) was significantly shorter than all other bite techniques (p < 0.05). Histological examination of the harvested segments from each group revealed similar pathophysiological features.

Conclusion Oversized bites (1 mm), placed symmetrically and asymmetrically across the anastomosis, do not affect early patency in the rat femoral artery. A reduced reliance on conventional guidelines for suture bites appears acceptable during microarterial anastomoses if the goal is vessel patency. However, we believe clinical competence involves the ability to place small, even bites consistently and uniformly. During microsurgical training, the occasional large bite need not be replaced; however, the trainee should be encouraged to take standard bites.