J Pediatr Intensive Care 2022; 11(02): 114-119
DOI: 10.1055/s-0040-1718867
Original Article

Noninvasive Cardiac Output Monitoring Using Electrical Cardiometry and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
,
1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
2   Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
,
Aanchal Wats
1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
,
Mohammed Salameh
1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
2   Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
,
Arpit Agarwal
1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
2   Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
,
1   Department of Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
2   Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, San Antonio, Texas, United States
› Institutsangaben
Funding None.

Abstract

Cardiac output (CO) measurement is an important element of hemodynamic assessment in critically ill children and existing methods are difficult and/or inaccurate. There is insufficient literature regarding CO as measured by noninvasive electrical cardiometry (EC) as a predictor of outcomes in critically ill children. We conducted a retrospective chart review in children <21 years, admitted to our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) between July 2018 and November 2018 with acute respiratory failure and/or shock and who were monitored with EC (ICON monitor). We collected demographic information, data on CO measurements with EC and with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and data on ventilator days, PICU and hospital days, inotrope score, and mortality. We analyzed the data using Chi-square and multiple linear regression analysis. Among 327 recordings of CO as measured by EC in 61 critically ill children, the initial, nadir, and median CO (L/min; median [interquartile range (IQR)]) were 3.4 (1.15, 5.6), 2.39 (0.63, 4.4), and 2.74 (1.03, 5.2), respectively. Low CO as measured with EC did not correlate well with TTE (p = 0.9). Both nadir and mean CO predicted ventilator days (p = 0.05 and 0.01, respectively), and nadir CO was correlated with peak inotrope score (correlation coefficient of –0.3). In our cohort of critically ill children with respiratory failure and/or shock, CO measured with EC did not correlate with TTE. Both nadir and median CO measured with EC predicted outcomes in critically ill children.

Contribution to the Field

Cardiac output (CO) measurement is an important element of hemodynamic assessment in critically ill children, with existing methods being difficult and/or inaccurate. Electrical cardiometry (EC) has the capability of measuring CO noninvasively. We believe that our study is the first study in the literature to demonstrate a relationship between CO measured with EC and outcomes.




Publikationsverlauf

Eingereicht: 25. Juli 2020

Angenommen: 18. September 2020

Artikel online veröffentlicht:
19. November 2020

© 2020. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany

 
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