Am J Perinatol 2022; 39(16): 1805-1811
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1726385
Original Article

Factors Associated with Umbilical Venous Catheter Malposition in Newborns: A Tertiary Center Experience

Sasivimon Soonsawad
1   Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Canada
3   Ramathibodi Medical School, Chakri Naruebodindra Medical Institute, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Samut Prakan, Thailand
,
Emily A. Kieran
1   Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Canada
,
Joseph Y. Ting
1   Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Canada
2   BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
,
Esther AlonsoPrieto
1   Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Canada
2   BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
,
Julia K. Panczuk
1   Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Women's and Children's Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Canada
› Author Affiliations
Funding J.T. received investigator grant award from the British Columbia Children's Hospital Research Institute, which has no role in the design and conduct of the study, preparation, and decision to submit the manuscript for publication.

Abstract

Objective Umbilical venous catheters (UVC) are widely used in neonatal intensive care (NICU). Noncentral catheter position is known to be associated with multiple adverse complications; however, risk factors for catheter malposition are unclear. This work aimed to identify clinical risk factors and complications associated with UVC malposition in neonates admitted in an NICU.

Study Design A retrospective chart review was performed of inborn babies admitted to BC Women's Hospital NICU with UVC inserted in their first 7 days between July 2016 and June 2018. Infant and maternal demographic, radiograph, UVC-related data, and complications were reviewed.

Results A total of 257 infants had UVC placed; 158 (61%) and 99 (39%) were in central and noncentral positions after initial placement, respectively. Of initially central-placed UVCs, a further 35 (22%) were pulled back or migrated to malposition on follow-up X-ray. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed the use of larger UV (5 Fr) catheter (odds ratio [OR]: 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–5.6, p = 0.026) and escalation of respiratory support mode (OR: 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0–2.8, p = 0.049) as significant predictors of catheter malposition.

Conclusion Noncentral UVC position as well as migration were common after initial placement in this cohort. The use of larger size UV catheters and increasingly invasive respiratory support were risk factors associated with higher incidence of UVC malposition. Ongoing surveillance of UVC position is thus recommended.

Key Points

  • More than one-third of UV catheters were not in central position after the initial placement.

  • Large size UV catheters and increasingly invasive respiratory support were risk factors for UV malposition.

  • High incidence of UVC migration was found after initial central placement, warranting surveillance.



Publication History

Received: 30 October 2020

Accepted: 10 February 2021

Article published online:
14 April 2021

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