CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 · Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1728828
Original Article

SERUM GLP-2 is Increased in Association with Excess Gestational Weight Gain

Maike K. Kahr
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
2  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
,
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
3  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
,
Megan Galindo
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Megan Whitham
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Min Hu
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Kjersti M. Aagaard
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
,
Melissa A. Suter
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas
› Author Affiliations
Funding This work was funded by a pilot award from the Texas Medical Center Digestive Disease Center (P30DK56338 to M.A.S.), a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health NIH/NICHD (R00HD075858–03 to M.A.S), and the German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG, SA 2795/2–1 to M.K.K.).

Abstract

Objective Obesity in pregnancy bears unique maternal and fetal risks. Obesity has also been associated with chronic inflammation, including elevated serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Higher serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels have been implicated in driving this inflammation, a phenomenon called metabolic endotoxemia (ME). GLP-2, a proglucagon-derived peptide, is believed to be integral in maintaining the integrity of the intestine in the face of LPS-mediated endotoxemia. We hypothesized that obesity and/or excess weight gain in pregnancy would be associated with an increase in maternal and neonatal markers of ME, as well as GLP-2.

Study Design Paired maternal and neonatal (cord blood) serum samples (n = 159) were obtained from our pregnancy biobank repository. Serum levels of LPS, endotoxin core antibody-immunoglobulin M (EndoCAb-IgM), and GLP-2 were measured by ELISA. IL-6 and TNF-α were measured using a Milliplex assay. Results were stratified by maternal body mass index (BMI), maternal diabetes, and gestational weight gain (GWG).

Results Maternal IL-6 is significantly decreased in the obese, diabetic cohort compared with the nonobese, nondiabetic cohorts (95.28 vs. 99.48 pg/mL, p = 0.047), whereas GLP-2 is significantly increased (1.92 vs. 2.89 ng/mL, p = 0.026). Neonatal TNF-α is significantly decreased in the obese cohort compared with the nonobese cohort (12.43 vs. 13.93 pg/mL, p = 0.044). Maternal GLP-2 is significantly increased in women with excess GWG compared with those with normal GWG (2.27 vs. 1.48 ng/mL, p = 0.014). We further found that neonatal IL-6 and TNF-α are negatively correlated with maternal BMI (−0.186, p = 0.036 and –0.179, p = 0.044, respectively) and that maternal and neonatal IL-6 showed a positive correlation (0.348, p < 0.001).

Conclusion Although we observed altered levels of markers of inflammation (IL-6 and TNF-α) with maternal obesity and diabetes, no changes in LPS or endoCAb-IgM were observed. We hypothesize that the increased GLP-2 levels in maternal serum in association with excess GWG may protect against ME in pregnancy.

Key Points

  • Maternal serum levels of GLP-2, a proglucagon-derived peptide, are increased in obese, diabetic gravidae.

  • Maternal serum GLP-2 levels are also increased in association with excess gestational weight gain compared with normal gestational weight gain.

  • GLP-2 may be increased in association with obesity and weight gain to protect against metabolic endotoxemia in pregnancy.

Supplementary Material



Publication History

Received: 10 June 2020

Accepted: 02 March 2021

Publication Date:
03 May 2021 (online)

© 2021. The Author(s). This is an open access article published by Thieme under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonDerivative-NonCommercial License, permitting copying and reproduction so long as the original work is given appropriate credit. Contents may not be used for commercial purposes, or adapted, remixed, transformed or built upon. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)

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