Journal of Pediatric Epilepsy 2022; 11(01): 015-020
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1736214
Original Article

Clinical Predictive Factors of Pathological EEG in Children with Febrile Seizures and Their Association with Subsequent Epileptic Seizures

1   Department of Physiology and Functional Explorations, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
2   Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
,
Ines Kammoun
1   Department of Physiology and Functional Explorations, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
2   Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
,
Sahar Chakroun
1   Department of Physiology and Functional Explorations, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
2   Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
,
Asma Haddar
1   Department of Physiology and Functional Explorations, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
2   Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
,
Kaouthar Masmoudi
1   Department of Physiology and Functional Explorations, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
2   Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Habib Bourguiba University Hospital, Sfax, Tunisia
› Author Affiliations

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify clinical parameters predicting either a pathological EEG or a subsequent epileptic seizure (SES), based on the relation between paroxysmal EEG abnormalities and clinical features in children who presented at least one febrile seizure (FS). We collected data of children who presented to our department during the period 2013 to 2018 for EEG recording as part of their febrile seizure assessment. Only children aged between 1 month to 5 years were included. Both the clinical and EEG data were retrospectively collected and statistically studied. We performed a detailed analysis of the EEG recordings. SES was identified for patients with sufficient follow-up. A total of 120 children were included in the study, of whom 48% had EEG abnormalities. Psychomotor retardation (p = 0.002), completion of an EEG within 7 days of the last FS (p = 0.046), and late age (> 3 years) of the first FS onset (p = 0.021) were significantly associated with a pathological EEG. In multivariate analysis, performing early EEG (< 7 days from the last FS) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.35; p = 0.043; confidence interval [CI]: 1.028–5.375) and psychomotor retardation (OR: 4.19; p = 0.008; CI: 1.46–12) were independent predictors of a pathological EEG. Of 120 patients, 45 had a follow-up. However, only 10 (22.22%) had SES. Children with SES tended more to have a psychomotor delay, compared with children without SES (50% vs. 14.28%, p = 0.029). Moreover, the percentage of initial abnormal EEG in patients with SES was significantly higher than those without SES (70% vs. 34.28%, p = 0.05). Even though some FS characteristics predict EEG abnormalities, they are not always associated with SES. We highlight the importance of performing an EEG in the group of children who had both FS and psychomotor retardation. This is most likely the group at the highest risk of developing epilepsy.



Publication History

Received: 25 April 2021

Accepted: 20 August 2021

Publication Date:
27 September 2021 (online)

© 2021. Thieme. All rights reserved.

Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Rüdigerstraße 14, 70469 Stuttgart, Germany