Am J Perinatol
DOI: 10.1055/s-0041-1740214
SMFM 2020

Incidence and Risk Factors for Postpartum Depression among Women with Preterm Prelabor Rupture of Membranes

Gregory Zemtsov
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Carmen M. Avram
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Alice Darling
2  Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
,
2  Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina
,
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
,
Sarah K. Dotters-Katz
1  Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina
› Author Affiliations
Funding None.

Abstract

Objective Patients admitted for preterm prelabor rupture of membranes are more likely to have risk factors for postpartum depression, including preterm delivery, low-birthweight infants, and a stressful life event. However, there is a paucity of data characterizing the development of postpartum depression in this population. We aim to evaluate the incidence of and describe risk factors for postpartum depression among patients admitted with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes.

Study Design This is a retrospective cohort study of patients admitted for preterm prelabor rupture of membranes in a single health system between 2013 and 2019. Patients who developed depression were compared with patients who did not develop depression. Demographic, antepartum/intrapartum/postpartum, and neonatal characteristics were compared. Bivariate statistics were used to compare outcomes and logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios.

Results Of 132 included patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes, 25 (18.9%) had postpartum depression. Factors significantly (p < 0.05) associated with postpartum depression included history of depression, anxiety, or any prior mental health condition. Earlier admission gestational age, rupture of membranes < 28 weeks, earlier delivery gestational age, neonatal morbidity, and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis also were significantly associated with postpartum depression. Latency, maternal postpartum length of stay, and neonatal intensive care unit length of stay were not significantly associated. In regression models, only a history of depression (odds ratio [OR], 11.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.78–50.95) and neonatal morbidity (OR, 5.01; 95% CI, 1.15–21.89) remained associated with postpartum depression.

Conclusion Postpartum depression occurred in nearly one in five patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes. Pre-existing depression and adverse neonatal outcomes strongly predicted postpartum depression. There is an urgent need to prioritize maternal mental health among patients with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes in the peripartum period. Further research is needed to identify optimal resources for mitigating the risk of postpartum depression in this cohort.

Key Points

  • After PPROM, postpartum depression is common.

  • Maternal depression and neonatal morbidity are risk factors for PPD.

  • Hospital admission permits intervention for PPD.

Meeting Presentation Disclosure

This data was presented in part as a virtual poster presentation (poster number 254) at the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine 41st Annual Pregnancy Meeting on January 25–30, 2021.




Publication History

Received: 14 June 2021

Accepted: 06 October 2021

Publication Date:
02 December 2021 (online)

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