Eur J Pediatr Surg 2014; 24(01): 046-050
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1349717
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Pediatric Trauma Team Activation: Are We Making the Right Call?

York Tien Lee
1  Department of Paediatric Surgery, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore
,
Xun Yi Jasmine Feng
1  Department of Paediatric Surgery, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore
,
Yea-Chyi Lin
1  Department of Paediatric Surgery, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore
,
Li Wei Chiang
1  Department of Paediatric Surgery, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

15 May 2013

09 June 2013

Publication Date:
12 July 2013 (eFirst)

Abstract

Introduction A regionalized trauma system must be tailored to the trauma epidemiology and the trauma care resources of the population it serves. Pediatric trauma system in Singapore differs from others because of its geographic compactness and relatively low incidence of severe trauma. The scarcity of polytrauma highlights the need of a reliable screening system to identify injured children who necessitate urgent transport to emergency department (ED) with pediatric resuscitation capacity as well as activation of trauma team upon their arrival. In this study, the validity of Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS), Glasgow Come Scale (GCS), and respiratory rate (RR) in identifying pediatric patients with major trauma and receipt of resuscitation is evaluated.

Patients and Methods After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective analysis was performed using data obtained from our trauma registry between January 2011 and December 2012. Information pertaining to the demographics, causative mechanism, and injury description, resuscitation, admitting disciplines, surgical intervention, and outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of PTS, GCS, and RR to predict outcomes of interest are calculated.

Results A total of 92 patients were recruited. From the 92 patients, 26 sustained major trauma, and 21 patients received ED resuscitation. The mean age was 4 years 9 months. Sensitivity and specificity of PTS ≤ 8, GCS ≤ 10, and abnormal RR for predicting major trauma were 61.5, 77.3; 26.9, 100; and 53.8, 60.6%; respectively. When the reliability to identify patients received ED resuscitation was evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of PTS ≤ 8, GCS ≤ 10, and abnormal RR were 90.5, 83.1; 28.6, 98.6; and 76.2, 66.2%; respectively.

Conclusion The parameters of PTS need to be further refined to improve its accuracy and minimize the undertriage rate. If a combined physiologic and anatomic scoring system such as PTS is used, other physiologic parameters such as GCS and RR may become redundant. The evaluation of the validity of PTS, GCS, and RR in predicting pediatric major trauma indicated poor reliability.