Eur J Pediatr Surg 2014; 24(01): 094-096
DOI: 10.1055/s-0033-1354587
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Use of Surgisis for Abdominal Wall Reconstruction in Children with Abdominal Wall Defects

Hussein Naji
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
2  Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Jane Foley
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
2  Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
,
Henrik Ehren
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
2  Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

19 May 2013

16 July 2013

Publication Date:
05 September 2013 (eFirst)

Abstract

Aim Abdominal wall defects in children can present a challenge to the pediatric surgeon. Despite the development of new materials and modifications of surgical technique, no single approach has been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the authors experience using porcine small intestine submucosa for abdominal closure.

Patients and Methods A retrospective review of all patients with abdominal wall defects who underwent reconstruction with Surgisis at the authors' institution from 2004 to 2011 was performed. Patient demographics, cause of defect, recurrence, rate of infection, and length of follow-up were reviewed.

Results A total of 24 patients were identified as having Surgisis implanted for abdominal wall defects. The most common etiology of abdominal defect was omphalocele. All patients went on to heal wounds. Four patients developed postoperative seroma formation and another two had wound infection. Two recurrences in the form of incisional hernia were observed. Both resolved spontaneously without intervention during the follow-up. The median follow-up period was 5 years (range 2–9 y). No significant predictors of complications were identified.

Conclusions Surgisis is an effective adjunct in the repair of abdominal wall defects in children. Complication rates remain low. In addition, recurrence may disappear spontaneously as the patch absorbed and replaced by scar tissues. Further studies are warranted.