Eur J Pediatr Surg
DOI: 10.1055/s-0039-1681023
Original Article
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

Long-Term Effectiveness of Antireflux Surgery in Esophageal Atresia Patients

Linus Jönsson
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Michaela Dellenmark-Blom
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Oskar Enoksson
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Lars Göran Friberg
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Vladimir Gatzinsky
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Anders Sandin
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
,
Kate Abrahamsson
1  Department of Pediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
› Author Affiliations
Further Information

Publication History

17 September 2018

22 January 2019

Publication Date:
01 March 2019 (eFirst)

Abstract

Introduction Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common morbidity after esophageal atresia (EA) repair, and the antireflux procedure (ARP) is a way of treating GERD symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether reflux index (Ri) and growth were improved by ARP.

Materials and Methods Ninety-nine individuals with EA treated at the Queen Silvia Children's Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden, between 1997 and 2010 were followed prospectively according to a structured care program. Twenty-four-hour pH-metry (Ri) and growth were studied at birth, then at 1, 7, and 15 years of age. All the patients included had reached 7 years of age.

Results Preoperatively, Ri was significantly higher (32%) in the ARP than the non-ARP group (10%). Postoperatively, no difference was seen between the groups. However, at 7 and 15 years of age, Ri was significantly higher in the ARP group than in the non-ARP group. Weight (standard deviation scores) was significantly lower in the ARP group at 1 and 7 years of age when compared with the non-ARP group, but these differences were not seen at birth and at 15 years of age. In a multivariate analysis, only birth weight remained a significant factor for low weight at 7 years of age. At 15 years of age, no risk factors for low body weight were found.

Conclusion In the long term, ARP is not effective in reducing GERD as measured as Ri in EA patients. The ARP group had significantly lower weight at 1 and 7 years of age than the non-ARP group, but this was not the case at the age of 15.