Synlett 2017; 28(20): 2961-2965
DOI: 10.1055/s-0036-1588551
letter
© Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York

Regioselective Ylide Formation on Acetal-Functionalized Trialkyl Phosphonium Salts: Extending the Scope of Carbonyl Homologation

Arkesh Narayanappa, David Hurem, James McNulty*
  • Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1, Canada   Email: jmcnult@mcmaster.ca
We thank the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Solvay-Cytec Canada, Inc., the Ontario Centres of Excellence, and Connect Canada for financial support of this work.
Further Information

Publication History

Received: 29 June 2017

Accepted after revision: 22 July 2017

Publication Date:
22 August 2017 (eFirst)

Dedicated to Professor Victor Snieckus on the occasion of his 80th birthday

Abstract

The discovery of a complex-induced proximity effect and scope of regioselective ylide formation on acetal- and ketal-functionalized trialkylphosphine-derived phosphonium salts is explored as a route to homologated unsaturated carbonyl derivatives.

Supporting Information

 
  • References and Notes

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